Forum Posts

Michael Harrison Grose
Mar 09, 2021
In Civil War Pics
I found a slew of pictures yesterday & before I upload them all to my drive, I want to post this picture. Does anyone else remember this tower being there before they tore it down on July 3rd, 2000? It's the old Gettysburg National Tower. I'll post a few more soon with a few from Antietam since we visited Sharpsburg & Gettysburg that summer.
My first trip to Gettysburg, PA 1997
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Michael Harrison Grose
Mar 07, 2021
In Eastern Theatre
I am sure that most of you all are familiar with the Gettysburg Winter Lecture Series that are now, in this day & age, archived online. Due to the nature of our protocols with Covid-19, attending this year's events have not been a plausible occasion. If I am to retire with wisdom & leisure at hand, I believe that I will one day set up shop in or nearby the battlefield in Gettysburg, PA. I do not have to describe how our Holy Grail of setting & experience revolves around Gettysburg---Save those words for a poem or memoir. I am hoping that this community continues to thrive & grow & in the coming years we will be able to plan an annual meeting at Gettysburg. Though there are several great Rangers at Gettysburg, I have found Matt Atkinson to be my favorite. So my treat to y'all, if you have not checked it out already is this link that has a series of Winter Lectures given by the Rangers at Gettysburg. In 2021, Ranger Matt discusses, in a 21 minute video, the legacy of John Brown. Who he was, what he believed in, what Gettysburg owns now as artifacts & a few questions of controversy surrounding Kansas & the Harper's Ferry incident. If you haven't had the chance to dive into these lectures, please do yourself a favor & be sure not to miss out on the vast amount of Civil War fireworks & stories. In the past, Matt has discussed General Forrest at the Battle of Brice Crossroads, General Earl Van Dorn, Freemasonry in the Civil War & my favorite: After Gettysburg. Check out his latest video & those of other rangers at this link here: https://www.nps.gov/gett/learn/photosmultimedia/winter-lecture-series.htm As always, take care & rest easy. -----Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Feb 18, 2021
In Civil War Book Enabling
To get the question out of the way----I am wondering if any of you have read "The March" by E.L. Doctorow. I recovered a course that was on an old computer & decided to take the course. (Lectures & Notes) It's a Civil War (1845-1877) era course that is based out of Yale University & Professor David Blight. It was on Itunes, may still be, back in 2007-2008ish & I was able to purchase it with an Itunes card. In the professor's previous classes, he required the students to read "The Killer Angels" by Michael Shaara, which he suggested one ought to still read with the class. But with this version of his class, "The March" is required. I wanted to hear from y'all what you think about the novel, "The March." I think I will end up adding it to my collection soon sometime this Spring. Thanks in Advance! On to some enabling: New York Times & Some Detailed Picture Books The New York Times: Complete Civil War In this vast book, there are countless articles from the Times during the War---among other material. For example: Below is an article about The Battle of Gettysburg. The book is great for Primary Source Material. It came with a CD that would allow even more access to material, but I have misplaced it. I think it had a Civil War Strategy Game on it too, which, if I not mistaken, was fairly fun to play. Page 247-Details of Wednesday's Battle. (July 6th, 1863) Battle-Field Near Gettysburgh. The next book has photographs pertaining to the War varying from photos of Generals & Soldiers to Railways & Breastworks & so on. It is a heavy one---good for research & nice to have in a personal collection for sheer enjoyment. Complete & Dense to the Core. Here are a few pictures from the book above: Into The Wilderness Washington At War (Sorry for the Blurry Pic) The two pages above are a prime example of what the near 900 page book has to offer. With countless facets of the war to cover, it essentially leaves no stones unturned. This book, "The Blue & the Gray" is very simplistic; it would be a good book to give a young man or woman who is just starting to read about the Civil War. It was one of the first books that I got when I became interested in studying the War. Though simplistic, it is one of those necessary simplistic books. It is a great go to book when looking for a short summary of a certain event or diagnosis of the landscape & economics. It has some great paintings to go along with a nice format. Easy to read & digest. The book shares some quality detail & insight into topics like the economy. In my humble opinion, the best features are the maps & images, which are critical to a degree when starting out----of course depending on what type of reader one is or the age one starts digging & researching. I haven't looked at this one in some time, but growing up, it was one of my favorites. Always suits well to serve as a coffee table book. The Economics of War: Railroads & The Federal Blockade Below is a fine example of the art involved in "The Blue & the Gray" The Economics of War. With a quote from the man, General Sherman, written in 1860 before the War. (Turns out he was correct) The last book for now hones in on Soldier Life---Prisons----Secret Services---Hospitals. It is also a good starter book for anyone because it is easy to read & provides a lot of imagery with solid, valid descriptions. One of my favorite aspects of the book below is that it provides detailed photos & imagery of the soldier's equipment, be it infantry, artillery, cavalry or encampment. Protecting the Rear of the Army For the March to the Sea. 1864. Officer's Quarters at Decatur Hotel. 1864. Life in the Camp with Photographs. Mechanics of the IX Corps at Petersburg 1864 Notable Officers & Libby Prison Virginia. General Graham who was Captured at Gettysburg was exchanged & took part in the offensive assault against Fort Fisher, NC in 1865. Graham was wounded in the hip and shoulders on July 2nd and was captured. He would be exchanged for Confederate Brigadier General James Kemper in September. It was books like these that I started out with when I began to dive deeper into the Civil War. & while I read & enjoyed these books, they help lead me to books like The Memoirs of Grant & Sherman & "I Rode with Stonewall." They also helped me find Authors like Sears & Trudeau & books like "Richmond Burning" by Lankford. I reckon each Student or Professor or Writer have their methods when it comes to learning & growing. Again, like I've said before, this is a great platform to share ideas like these that come to the mind. So thanks for the work that has gone into this page & the involvement of the members. I hope you all can find some enjoyment out of the books I've shared above. Take Care! -----Michael
A Question & A Couple of Books content media
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Michael Harrison Grose
Feb 09, 2021
In Civil War Talk
I came across an article about F. Scott Fitzgerald being a Civil War buff & how he was the son of a man who, during Jubal Early's '64 Campaign, helped row a Confederate spy across the Potomac. The article tackles how Fitzgerald began to write about Dentistry in the Civil War in the 1930's after he had suffered with literary burnout & overall hardship. The article is written by a student at Gettysburg College; I am going to provide the link below. It was a great read---I wasn't aware that Fitzgerald was inspired by the Civil War at such great lengths. The site that published the article is www.civilwarmed.org The author of the piece is Cameron Sauers. It was published in April 2020.
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Michael Harrison Grose
Feb 01, 2021
In Civil War Book Enabling
These books are both of a fiction & non-fiction nature. 1) "You'll Be Scared. Sure---you'll be scared." Fear, Stress, & Coping in the Civil War. Written by Phillip M. Cole. I advise you to read this book as it deals with the psychological warfare of fighting in the Civil War. From sleep deprivation to general fatigue, to shouting---morale---& "beyond the first shot," the book gives first hand accounts from soldiers & commanders. Add that to the more modern psychological approach to mindset & it's a compelling book to read for anyone who is interested with what it would have been like to be there. 2) Lincoln's Devotional---This follows the every day of the year pattern where President Lincoln has marked down a verse from the Holy Bible & then went on to write a few lines of poetry afterwards to summarize what the verse(s) mean to him. It is quite humbling to read & has help me through some tough periods. This book helps staple the idea of Lincoln's genius & his wide range of talents beyond that of a mere President. The man never ceases to amaze me---the more I find out, the more I want to know. 3) "When Johnny Came Marching Home" by William Heffernan: Published in 2012, this fictional novel is a mystery novel. It follows a couple of boys from Vermont, criss-crossing back & forth through time, allowing the plot to unfold in a creative way where there is a murder to be solved post war. It is a coming of age story that speaks volumes about the horrors of war & the wages one paid to fight in the American Civil War----rifts & conflict coming between three close childhood friends. 4) "The Girl in Blue" written by Ann Rinaldi. Sarah is the "Girl in Blue" who disguises herself as a boy at a young age to fight in the Civil War. Not only does she have to encounter the elephant, she runs into a detective & things go wayward. A fictional account that does credit to suspense & romance during the War, "The Girl in Blue" was a book I picked up when I left Greenville, NC to move back to Western North Carolina. 5.) "Battle Pieces" Civil War Poems of Herman Melville. It goes without saying that Melville is one of America's most prolific--well known writers, but perhaps overlooked is his poetry he wrote during the war & then collected--organized & formed into a book in 1866. There are over 60 poems & memorials within this collection. "Contrary to popular belief, Stanton Garner contends, Herman Melville was not intellectually and emotionally detached from the war. In actuality, Melville brooded over the war's enormous brutality and destructive power. At the same time, his passion for writing, which had suffered greatly in the wake of his grand failures of the 1850s, revived. With renewed purpose, Melville saw an opportunity to establish himself as the prophet—poet of a rededicated America. The vehicle for this ambitious, and ultimately unfulfilled, enterprise was to be Battle-Pieces, an epically conceived book of poems that chronicles the war from John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry through Lincoln's assassination." ----Kansas Press 6) "The Maps of Gettysburg" An Atlas of the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3-July 13, 1863 created by Bradley M. Gottfried. I believe that this is a must have for all the Gettysburg Gurus out there. The break down of the regiments & the positions on the field are outstanding. For the majority of the book, opened with a left page & a right page, there is a valid, thorough description on the left page of the map on the right page. The narrative follows that of the timeline before the battle, during the battle, & during Lee's retreat & Meade's pursuit. It has been a while since I have studied it since I am researching the winters of 63, 64 & 65 for a series of short stories, so retrieving it from the bookshelf to share it with you all has perked the cartographer within me up a bit. Again, a must have for the Gettysburg Die-Hards out there. 7) "The Civil War in the Smokies" written by Noel Fisher: Noel taught U.S. History at Ohio State University at Marion & Ohio Wesleyan University. He wrote another book: "War at Every Door: Partisan Politics & Guerrilla Violence in East Tennessee, 1860-1869" My family are no strangers to the Mountains in Tennessee; we tend to go to the cabin there at least three times a year, save this year, we've only been once. In Tennessee, there are many plaques & memorials built to recognize those that fought for the South & also, perhaps more than one would think, those who stayed loyal to the Union & wore blue. The book covers the Antebellum period in the Smokies, then moves on to the role Secession played in the area. It sparks the debate on how the War was seen as being "Only One Innocent Battle" to the reality that a prolonged war developed a place void of innocence. It weighs out the price of war on the area & how, in the end, the desperation of the Confederates took its toil on the quiet, serene Smoky Mountains in Eastern Tennessee. This non-fiction account provides a great number of pictures & maps, explaining numerous political & military motions. President Lincoln believed that East Tennessee was perfect for a base of loyalist movements to help encourage other loyalist operations in the South. My favorite 'motion' in this book recalls the time when Major General Burnside captured Knoxville & fortified it against Major General Longstreet. This led to Bragg being deprived of Longstreet's Corps after the Battle of Chickamauga. General Grant had a plan for Burnside to defend Knoxville until he could send reinforcements. After a stint of siege on Knoxville, some knowledge of General Sherman coming to aid Burnside in Knoxville reached Longstreet & he chose to attack Fort Sanders. He was repulsed. Burnside thereafter refused Sherman's help. Sherman was agitated. He wanted to drive the Confederates out of East Tennessee all together. All in due time I suppose. It gets interesting around this time because Western North Carolina woke up & Governor Vance of North Carolina made things quite intriguing. This book is well researched for sure & is easy to read. Check it out if you are interested. -Sorry, didn't mean to preach (LOL) Take good care & rest easy! ----Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 31, 2021
In Eastern Theatre
This is a print of a Mort Kuntsler painting that I have a small collection of in my desk drawer; I am fortunate to sport two of his full size paintings (prints) of Pickett's Charge & Chamberlain on Little Round Top respectively in my cabin office & my office upstairs. I discovered him when I visited Gettysburg in 1997 for the first time & admire his creative gifts he has given to the Civil War Community. This print is called "Dilger at Gettysburg---Near Barlow's Knoll." Though I have studied Gettysburg in depth for many years, there is always something new that pops up & grabs my attention. The back of the card reads: "It was a desperate moment. Driven back on the first day at Gettysburg, the Northern Army had to hurriedly redeploy along Cemetery Ridge before the Confederates could takes advantage of the retreat. Captain Hubert Dilger, a veteran Federal artillery officer, ordered two of his field pieces forward without infantry support. Dilger's gun crews were exposed to a devastating fire, but they unflinchingly pounded away at the Confederate positions--and slowed the Southern advanced. Northern forces were able to fortify strong positions on Cemetery Ridge, & there stayed until two more days of battle left them victorious." (Painting 1989) Amid the rush & the chaos of the retreat & the advance of the armies moving down from the North through Gettysburg, this captain chose to stand & fight with his artillery without any infantry to help shield the cannon fire pouring into the oncoming Confederates. It is moments like this, not just at Gettysburg, but throughout the war that may go overlooked at times, yet prove to be momentous toward a victory in their own unique way. After seeing this print, I uploaded a picture of it to my new computer. & I have decided to look more into this captain & the exact position of these field pieces on the first day of battle. If they weren't captured by Ewell's Corps, then what role did they play on July 2nd & July 3rd? etc. Thanks for your time---I thought I would share this as it was fresh on my mind & this forum allows me to turn a few lines of note into a couple of paragraphs. If you all have not noticed, if you are in to this type of thing, I have Gettysburg on my Weather Apps & it looks like they are in for 8-14 inches of snow this weekend. It would be a beautiful time to tread the battlefield with a nice coat & cigar. Every take care & keep your health up! -----Michael
Captain Dilger--Near Barlow's Knoll--Gettysburg
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 29, 2021
In Civil War Talk
Food for thought & an idea for the website for the future: Perhaps consider a type of trivia, weekly or bi-monthly. Wouldn't have to have prizes, just a fun way to continue to interact with one another. The idea just hit me while looking around some other sites. Hope everyone is well & staying healthy & safe! Take care. ---Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 18, 2021
In Civil War "What If..."
If you had the opportunity to pick two Generals from opposing sides to lead an Army during the American Civil War, which two would you choose? & to add to the question, what other two Generals from opposing sides would you choose to oppose your original pick. Though simple in nature, I'd go with Grant & Jackson vs Sherman & Lee. My second choice for this would be Hancock & Longstreet vs Meade & Breckinridge. All in good fun, I have often wondered how each Commander would have fared against each other if the shoes were on the other feet. Anyways, if you want to add your two cents, by all means, I'd be excited to read your pairing. All the Best! --Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 16, 2021
In Civil War Talk
Fun Scenario Question If you had to choose a fortification between Marye's Heights or the Fortification Works at Cold Harbor, which one would you choose? & another one, if you had to choose between Culps Hill or a Reinforced Pittsburg Landing, which one would you choose? ---Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 14, 2021
In Civil War Book Enabling
This isn't a book that has to do with the American Civil War, but it was written at the same time Michael Shaara was writing the Killer Angels. It wasn't published then, but his son went on to have it published, the unedited version a few years back. There are parallels in this book for anyone who has enjoyed or been influenced by Shaara's "The Killer Angels." The book does have conversations in it about the Civil War & World War II. It takes place in Florida at a fictional University "Cawdor." The premise for the book is that the school's president will not allow a short story to published in the University's Newspaper. This starts a school protest, sit in. I read it in two sittings. With the first day being 3 chapters, & then I couldn't put it down the following day until I finished it. Though not a Civil War companion book perhaps it serves well as a Michael Shaara Companion book to the "The Killer Angels." You can order it online fairly easy. I don't think you will regret it.
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 11, 2021
In Civil War "What If..."
While writing one of the two posts I have written here today, I had a sparkling What If discussion idea that hit me, but it seems for the time being, I have forgotten it. So I wanted to at least throw an idea on the site regarding General Lee becoming the Commander of all Union Forces in 1861. How do you think it would have impacted the Civil War? Would it have ended sooner? Would he persuade some of the Confederate Generals to remain loyal to the Union? How much, in that nature, did he possess with the power of persuasion? No one can render the man useless in Military Ability, though I do not want to make him equal to Ares--The God of War. I think fighting for the South made him more dangerous & perhaps more agile. Playing defense suited him & the 75,000 volunteers more than likely would have been pressed to attack the Southern Army with Lee commanding the Union troops. A delicate issue with this question relies on Lee's Estate & the Institution of Slavery. By Constitution Law & before the 13th Amendment, Lee's loyalty to the Union would have been an interesting entity to see play out--this betting on a Union Advantage & proposed hope that the war would end swiftly----If one looks at it in a way where it took 21 months for the Emancipation Proclamation to be released, 46 months of the war for the 13th Amendment to be passed in the House, 11 more months for it to be ratified----General Lee turning down the offer was a blessing for those who were anxious to see him accept the command. That being stated, how much longer would slavery be tolerated in the Union granted Lee took Command & help end the war sooner. & now the questions just pour in. Would General Lee assure a swift end to the Rebellion? Could President Lincoln move faster to press the House to create the 13th Amendment? Would Lee, the man, be an advocate to abolish the Institution of Slavery? It is quite perplexing & complicated. It is one thing to consider Military Victory alone without two separate Governments. It is another to to combine both Battle & Diplomacy. It's delicate for certain. So perhaps, it is a two tier question: One consisting of Military Victory with the exemption of the platform of President Lincoln with the other including both Victory & what Lincoln & men like him were ushering in during those days of tribulation & the dire need for the United States to change. For those who have read "Team of Rivals" or watched the movie "Lincoln" it is known how challenging it was, even with the South all but starved to get the 13th Amendment passed. It's odd that when I began to write this, I meant to keep it simple. I reckon my subconscious has been bouncing this "What If" more than I was capable of knowing. In conclusion, I offer up the questions solely based on "When would the shooting have stopped?" The element of the keen relationship Lincoln & Lee would have had & needed. & finally, if Lee had accepted the offer, how would that have affected the Constitutional change that abolished the Institution of Slavery? *This being based on my hypothesis that General Lee would have helped the Union quell the Rebellion sooner than 1865. So if you think that the General would not have done much, if any, to shorten the War----please feel free to give it a go with your own premise that would differ from mine that relies on Lee helping to end the War sooner. I am not sure how you all feel about What Ifs. I find myself torn from being intrigued at times & too busy with what actually happened in the Civil War. I believe volumes could be written about this & that if things didn't happen as fate would have it; though I believe the headache of straight laced historical research is a headache on its own too much sometimes. Personally I pray that if Lee would have assumed command and helped the Union win the war, Slavery would have been abolished without more conflict than it took. How would it all have affected Virginia---would the General been seen as a traitor to his native state, having to take up real estate in Pennsylvania or New York? I, by no means, want to put the General in a type of spotlight that would shadow great men like Grant, Sherman, Hooker, Burnside, Hancock, Meade, Reynolds, Howard, Rosecrans or any other game changers from the Federal side. I am basing this on the all too familiar mistake folks made then thinking that any War would have only lasted a few months. Thanks for your time, take good care. If any of you know of a good book or essay about this topic, please feel free to share. All the best! ---Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 10, 2021
In Civil War "What If..."
Given the success at Second Manassas by the Army of Northern Virginia & the beginning of the first Northern Invasion, where, if not Antietam/Sharpsburg MD, would the two armies have met on the battlefield that would have given 1) The North a better advantage 2) The South a better advantage. I understand the importance of the Garrison of Harper's Ferry & a necessity for the South to possibly swing the state of Maryland. Just wondering if anyone has ever thought of an area that could have benefited the North or the South more. (Even though the expulsion of the South from Maryland helped the North with Foreign Affairs) This is somewhat in comparison to the Pipe Creek Plan General Meade had during the Gettysburg Campaign. -Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 03, 2021
In Civil War Road Trips
The summer before my 9th grade year in high school, my parents and my best friend decided to take a road trip to visit both Antietam and Gettysburg. I had become fascinated with the Civil War in 8th grade & this was a better option for us than going to the beach. From reading a book about Gen. Stoneman's last ride that my 8th grade English teacher gave to me to spending hours playing Civil War Generals on the computer, July couldn't come fast enough. I remember riding up Highway 81 through the Shenandoah Valley & being memorized at the scenery. The valley is so vast & it stretches on & on. When I visit Gettysburg from my hometown these days, I am blessed to take the scenic route up Highway 81. When I lived in Raleigh, I would travel up Highway 95, making sure to veer off from the dense traffic of Washington DC as soon as it was feasible. Back in 1997, we stayed two nights in a hotel in Sharpsburg. We spent the whole day at the battlefield. There was a ranger who spoke at the visitors center for about an hour and a half. We then took a guided tour in our car getting out at hallowed spots like Dunker Church, the Bloody Lane, Miller's Cornfield and Burnside's Bridge. After about 5 hours of being in a state of awe and sorrow, we ended up back at the visitors center and took dozens of photos. I would upload them here but I haven't transferred any pictures to my new computer yet. (I will once I get around to do so.) Anyways, we left the next day to go to Gettysburg and ended up staying at the Quality Inn Motor Lodge right there on Cemetery Hill. The first thing that I did once we checked in was check out the book shop adjacent to the front desk. It was there that I picked up "The Killer Angels." I had yet to see the movie, "Gettysburg" so it was a blessing in disguise to read the story first.(Love Books!) That night we just relaxed and hung out in the hotel since we were worn out from travel. I remember it well because it was the first time that the MLB played inter-league baseball. The Braves were playing the Yankees since those two teams were in the World Series in 96. I forget who pitched for the Braves but I remember Andy Pettitte pitching for the Yankees. It was already magical. We spent five days there. They were having the annual reenactment, which was an amazing thing to see for the first time. The cannons, hospitals, soldiers were a sight to behold. This was when the reenactments were held on Herr's Ridge. (Again, I'll post pictures once I transfer them) We took advantage of just about everything the Park had to offer. Took the bus tour. Took the car guided tour. Viewed the Cyclorama. Listened to Rangers. We spent some time on Little Round Top and made sure to climb both towers on Culps Hill and Seminary Ridge. During the down time, I read "The Killer Angels." I couldn't put it down. I finished it in 3 or 4 days and decided that I too wanted to leave a mark on the world when it came to the Civil War. I highly recommend staying at the Motor Lodge-you can even play a little putt putt there. The attractions were all about with Civil War era tents and exhibits. The shops were compelling. I even got one of those old time photos of me in the Butternut Gray. I tried to look as serious as possible, as my friend was having a good time, smiling and laughing. I wasn't angry by any means but a bit irked. I don't know how I would have fared for a 14 year soldier though I was in the zone. That summer I was playing for a baseball team who was headed to the Junior Tarheel State Championship the following week. So I visited the batting cage near the battlefield a couple of times. It wasn't easy to focus on baseball in Gettysburg. There is so much more I could say about my first trip to both battlefields, but I believe a verbal discussion could only do it proper justice at this point. Since then, I have probably visited Gettysburg 10 times. On the anniversary in 2004, I got "The Last Full Measure" signed by Jeff Shaara. He told me some writing advice his father had passed down. It is called the BIC method. Butt in Chair. It was a bit nerve wracking to meet Jeff, "Gods and Generals" hit the movie screen the year before. That trip was quite eventful. When I was walking on Cemetery Ridge, I went out from the Pennsylvania Monument onto the field of Pickett's Charge to have a cigarette and sat down on a rock. Swear to God, I heard footsteps behind me and turning around, no one was there. It was serene & odd. I felt strength instead of fear. I was like a kid in a candy store. I even went to a Yankee camp and played Dixie on the guitar to get a few laughs, all in good fun, though a lady politely reminded me that I was in the wrong camp to be playing that tune. I had planned to go this year, but because of Covid-19, I have had to postpone my trip. When I lived in Raleigh, it was a six hour drive. Where I live now, It is about 8 hours. After traveling on 81, I always make sure to take the route that leads through Emmitsburg. (Highway 15 I believe) Beautiful scenery there as well. Another time I went with two friends in February. An itch needed to be scratched. I believe the average temperature was about 19 degrees with a fair amount of sleet. Needless to say we spent most of the time on the battlefield going about six miles an hour in my Civic. The rest of the time in the hotel room, which to be fair was nothing to complain about. Being there, breathing in the air was good enough for us. I haven't been in about 3 years now. But a word to the wise, if you plan on walking around the battlefield, be aware of the ticks. I believe there were about 8 or 9 on me when I got back to my room. Since 2005, my favorite place on the battlefield is East Cemetery Hill. I have longed studied the 153rd Pennsylvania and enjoy the serenity of that area. I have a distant relative who was a corporal in Company B of the 153rd PA. On the other side, Isaac Avery was from the county that is only 30 miles from where I live. That's an interesting story. Almost as interesting as Gen. Sickles being wounded the way he was. Talk about a one in a million shot. I have also devoted some time studying the 6th NC. Forgive me for the long post and the bits of rambling, I can hardly help myself when it comes to spreading the gospel of Gettysburg. Though I love Antietam, Gettysburg far outweighs any battlefield I have been to. To close this out I'll list the battlefields I have visited: Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Fort Fisher, Bentonville, Plymouth, New Market, Winchester, Petersburg, New Bern, Harper's Ferry, Monocacy, Hampton Roads and finally the Charleston area with the multiple forts. I was going to attend the 2020 Bentonville Reenactment this year but misfortune claimed the day-it was canceled. Trust me when I get the chance and things have cleared up, I will be at O'Rorkes having a pint of pale ale on the front porch. I have longed to get out West since I have become obsessed with General Grant. Again, forgive me for the long post. I will be sure to upload some pictures when I get them transferred to this computer. Thanks for the thoughtful platform. Everyone take care & stay safe! All the best! -Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose
Jan 03, 2021
In Civil War Book Enabling
For those of you all who are interested in the overall Civil War Experience, I would highly recommend Eleanor Agnes Lee's Diary about growing up in the 1850's. It gives great insight to what life was like being a daughter of General Lee growing up in Arlington House and West Point. She started writing it to improve her "style" at the age of 12. The Memoirs of US Grant are an amazing, detailed account of his early life, the Army, his presidency. He starts out with a foreword that expresses that he will do his best to respect both sides of the war: The National and the Confederacy, except when it is necessary to not be kind or courteous. Those are my two cents for now. I am looking forward to being introduced to as many books as possible. All the best! -Michael
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Michael Harrison Grose

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